Biological Oceanography

Introduction

Plankton sampling using a large net in the Antarctic Ocean (upper) anda novel diatom-feeding flagellate discovered in Onagawa Bay (lower).

Plankton sampling using a large net in the Antarctic Ocean (upper) and a novel diatom-feeding flagellate discovered in Onagawa Bay (lower).

Plankton and other organisms in lower trophic levels are playing an important role in establishing, maintaining and altering global environment as well as sustaining production of marine ecosystems. We are studying plankton and benthos not only from the view point of sustainable resource utilization, but from biological oceanographic interests to clarify structure and function of marine ecosystems, and evaluate the effects of global warming on marine ecosystems. Research fields span from nearby coastal area to remote oceans such as North Atlantic and Antarctic Oceans. Major topics include biology, ecology and molecular ecology of protozoans and plankton, ecology of euphausiids, effect of global warming on molluscs, ecology of polychaetes and molecular ecology of dinoflagellates.

URL

http://www.agri.tohoku.ac.jp/aquaeco/index-j.html

Keyword

plankton, benthos, life history, ecology, taxonomy, biological oceanography, microbial loop, food chain

  •  

    Waka Sato-Okoshi(Associate Professor)

    Tel : +82-22-757-4243
    Fax : +82-22-757-4246
    E-mail : wsokoshi*bios.tohoku.ac.jp(Please replace * with @)

    Research interest:

    polychaete ecology, biological oceanography, marine environmental science

  • Goh Nishitani

    Goh Nishitani(Assistant Professor)

    Tel : +82-22-757-4247
    Fax : +82-22-757-4246
    E-mail : ni5*bios.tohoku.ac.jp(Please replace * with @)

    Research interest:

    phytoplankton, bivalves, molecular ecology

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